Why Lower Manhattan’s Micro-Mobility Hub Is A Game Changer

This summer, many eyes were cast on the West Coast as Santa Monica and San Francisco came to grips with the sudden popularity of dockless e-scooter sharing. The cities quickly banned the operators of the vehicles, fearing a free-for-all, and then subsequent allowed only a relative handful to return. The main point of contention between regulators and the venture backed firms that operate the scooters is their relationship with sidewalk and public space; municipal leaders are concerned about bikes and scooters strewn across the streets, potentially causing a public hazard and nuisance.

On the other side of the country, in New York, a remarkable pilot is taking place in the heart of the city’s Downtown. At the end of September, Oonee, in partnership with the Alliance for Downtown New York will introduce a micro-mobility pod that will provide secure, weather-protected, parking for bikes and scooters. The service will be housed in a smart, modular, free-standing pod, which can be assembled on-site in less than a day and easily removed or modified. This innovative design approach also allows the structure to be customized to specific shapes and sizes in order to meet the contours of various urban spaces.

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DOT Data: Private Bikes Still King on NYC Roads

Within the course of my daily conversations, I often get asked about the need to create parking infrastructure for privately owned bikes– the assumption being that cyclists have, or will, switch over to CitiBike, the city’s wildly popular bikeshare system.

Though I am a huge fan of the bikeshare movement, it’s worth remembering that traditional private bikes still account for the vast majority of cycling trips within the city, as well as a large segment of market growth over the years, a reality that isn’t set to change anytime soon. Cities would be best to design infrastructure for both bikeshare and personal bikes.

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Four Better Ways To Raise Money For The Subway

Last week Governor Cuomo made headlines by announcing that the MTA would be seeking to implement a corporate sponsorship model for New York’s subway stations. Cuomo argues that conservancies, which are mostly funded through private dollars, worked for parks and thus could inject New York’s struggling subway system with some much needed capital. The city’s subway denizens who suffer through both chronic delays and dreary, nasty stations environments, may be inclined to agree.

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Annotating Rahm Emanuel’s Subway Op-Ed

Last weekend, the MTA’s recent struggles went national when the Mayor of Chicago, published a Monday New York Times Op-Ed entitled “In Chicago, The Trains Actually Run on Time.” The haughty, headline of Emanuel’s opine earned a swift backlash from New York’s press and many ordinary citizens. New Yorkers may hate the MTA, but it’s our MTA! Beneath all of the noise, there was a rare, thoughtful and prominent critique of urban mass transit best practices.

For me, many of Emanuel’s argument’s resonated, while other’s didn’t.

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Cuomo’s Initiatives Shed Light on Need For Regional Plan

Last night, the New York Times ran a local reaction story that seemed pretty typical for those who’ve grown accustomed to following development and infrastructure in the region. Times reporters questioned local residents about Governor Cuomo’s plan to replace the Sheridan Expressway with a more neighborhood friendly boulevard and, predictably, found a range of opinions. Many loved the idea, others expressed concerns. Among those who weren’t so sure, a common refrain was used: Is this the best way to spend $1.8 billion?

That’s a good question.

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Selling Homeless Shelters to the Public

As homelessness rises to record highs, community opposition to proposed shelters remains deep-seated and, for local elected officials, implacable. In Brooklyn last week, residents blasted the mayor’s proposal for a shelter in Crown Heights, and in Salt Lake City, residents are pleading with the state to intervene in the city’s plan to place a  shelter near Downtown. In Los Angeles, communities are opposed to even storage facilities for items belonging to the homeless. Similar themes have cropped up in almost every city; no one wants a homeless shelter in their backyard.

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